As the Readers Turn by Janice Jones Author of The Dagger Chronicles Series, In Her Blood and By Blood Sworn   I never realized how hard this was going to be. I started out just wanting to keep myself busy by putting words on a page to form a story I wanted to read. But, […]
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The Humor of Overactive Parents in Books for Kids by Lorri Horn Author of Dewey Fairchild, Parent Problem Solver   I don’t know about you, but every time I hear the term “helicopter parenting” I want to duck for cover. It’s not that I’m so opposed to the concept as much as I’m afraid something is […]
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Inspiration + Research = Novel   by Dawn Reno Langley   Author of The Mourning Parade   My mother never had much. She lived in an apartment in someone else’s home most of her life. For most of my school days, we lived on the second and third floor of my grandmother’s home. Then my parents […]
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“I’ve been on the fringes of your social circles, envying you from a distance. Sometimes you let me in for a better view. Usually, I only get a glimpse.” -Dream Me Just like Babe—the main character of my new novel, Dream Me—my childhood was spent in transit, moving from city to city, country to country. For the most part, it had little effect on me, as I mainly viewed my family as the nucleus of my life. And then I was transferred to yet another school where I was still learning the language when the teacher inexplicably decided it would be educational for the other students to hear the new girl sing her national anthem in front of the class. I was given a day to prepare. My mother dutifully typed out the lyrics (all verses) and I dutifully got up and did my best to sing them. I’m sure I was awful. I’m sure the other kids snickered. I have no idea because I was in a temporary daze.
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One of the most eye-opening things I experienced when I had children was the way their brains absorb everything—and I mean everything—from the minute they open their eyes. Babies and toddlers are most amazing—their brains are literally empty slates you can almost see filling with information. I’ve felt a great responsibility, because I knew the space was limited and I certainly didn’t want neural connections that might lead to solar-powered airplanes to instead record useless information or, worse, ideas of consumption, materialism, or violence.
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